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Yesterday I had a great outing with a friend, who I’ll call her Lisa, during the course of our conversation I shared my feelings with her about two people whom we shared mutual acquaintances.  This couple who I’ll refer to as Sarah and Sam are wonderful people in their own way, don’t get me wrong, but for me, they were like Dementors. They literally sucked the life out of me, it didn’t matter how good of a mood I was in, the moment they walked into the room, my mood went from 100-0 in sixty seconds flat!  Lisa smiled and said, that’s because they’re Emotional Vampires. I was not familiar with this term, but she clarified for me, among other things. Lisa  also told me the reason why people like that were attracted to me, it was because I was an easy target for them.  I was their sponge, I absorbed their negative energy, as they sucked out all my ‘Happiness.’

 I’ve always been accused of being an anti-social introvert, something I’ve argued against for many years; but it wasn’t that I was anti-social. It just took too much effort to socialise, and I didn’t like the toll it took on me emotionally, it was hard trying to discern like-minded people;  with the popularity of social media and it being such an enormous outlet for socialising ‘without’ contact, really didn’t make much of a difference.  Whatever people projected, whether face to face  or behind a computer screen, the effects were the same.
But despite it all life goes on, and as Lisa said it’s something I would have to control, something that I would have to learn to use to my advantage. Digging deeper and reading several articles on Emotional Vampires, I’ve found that they can be anyone, family members, co-workers, partners. With family members and Partners being the worse of the lot, because we often let our own emotions dilute our senses, and we either don’t realise it or choose not to accept that they are literally sucking the life out of us.
Emotional Freedom  is the key to releasing yourself from people such as these, but you must first learn to identify that there is a problem.

© Etta D. Richards