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When you look at your body in the mirror, where do your eyes go first? Odds are, your gaze goes straight to your “trouble spots”—the places you’d love to change, if only you had the time, the money or the energy.

Maybe you straighten your spine, fluff your hair or use your hands to smooth your stomach. Or maybe you grunt and criticize yourself for a moment. Why can’t you just look…better. 

If these little habits sound familiar, you’re not alone. Many of us have a tendency to focus on the trouble spots—to allow those negative feelings to become negative self-talk that soon turns into negative behavior.

Have you ever dropped a few self-loathing comments to garner sympathy or compliments? Or spent far too much cash to cultivate the image you think you should be portraying? Obsessing about what you want to change (and how) does nothing more than train your brain to think that what it sees is who you are.

And that’s just not true.

THE SCIENCE OF SELF-LOATHING

Your brain is constantly piecing together images of the world based on the data it receives via your senses and feelings (a.k.a. hormones). That mental picture, in turn, affects your mental and emotional state.

When you look in the mirror, your brain uses these contextual clues like how you feel to determine what you see. In other words, the little tummy pooch you can’t help but notice every time you catch your reflection probably doesn’t even cross the minds of the people around you. Ever.

How-to-Retrain-Your-Mind-to-Love-Your-Body-Care2-2

HOW TO RETRAIN YOUR MIND TO LOVE (NOT LOATHE) YOUR BODY

Most people—women in particular—have unknowingly trained themselves to search for every single minor flaw possible. (There’s a reason the beauty industry is doing so well.) If this habit starts early—say, as a child or teenager—the self-hatred ritual (and thus, the same neural network) only grows.

This means that body insecurity, as well as poor self-esteem, is a habit we must simply unlearn. Easier said than done, I know, but you get the idea. Here are a few strategies you can use to start building a healthier picture of your body:

1. Take it all in.

It’s time to employ your wide-angle lens. Let your eyes skim over the entirety of your person, without sticking on any parts you’d like to change. Remember: You are a whole, beautiful person, not a mismatch of “if-only’s.”

2. Make changes (within reason). 

There is nothing wrong with heading to the gym when you’re starting to see a little extra around the middle. Go for it! Just make sure you have a healthy “why” in place, and focus on the amount of weight you can lift, not what you look like.

3. Choose to see the positive.

Self talk—whether positive or negative—is something you have all the power in the world to change. Work hard to stop comparing yourself to other people and choose to adopt new, positive patterns of thinking.

Source

~Happy Wednesday

 

13 thoughts on “Wonderful Wednesday-How to Retrain Your Mind to Love Your Body…

    1. When I look back at all the time I wasted worrying about my outward appearance it really makes my head spin. Age I think forces us to appreciate our inside self more than our outward self.

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  1. I work in a rich and wealthy neighborhood. Lots of trust fund babies and rich society matrons. I suppose they rely on their looks to keep their station in life so plastic surgery is the order of the day. Botox, lip fillers, Juvaderm and Restylyne parties. Gotta get rid of the wrinkles. Plenty facelifts. Can’t allow aging to make your body parts sag so they get work done. Hang onto that rich man. Keep him away from the young chippies. It’s a competition against the aging process.

    As for me I cannot afford plastic surgery but if I had extra money to splurge I would get a boob job.
    Why?
    Because on the job I wear a uniform and have been mistaken for a man dozens of times over the ten years I’ve worked at the museum. Even though I usually wear lipstick and earrings the visitors still think I’m a guy! Boggles the mind. Also I’ve always wanted a more womanly curvy figure so I can look better in my clothes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. LOL! Buy a push-up bra, it’s cheaper than a boob job. There are ladies undies with curves that you can wear underneath your clothing. Again cheaper than surgery. lol! lol!
      I have too many curves so be careful what you wish for 🙂 lol lol

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      1. Well bigger boobs are just a wish list. No money for breast enhancement. Push up bras are nice but only work if you have something to push! I’m so flat chested that I can walk around without a bra and on the weekends I do. Since I can’t afford surgery I drink as many Ensure supplement as possible. If I ever find Aladdins Lamp i will ask the Genie for bigger boobs! 😀😁😂🤣😃😄😅😉😆😉

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Now that I think about it my Mom was busty. Very 1950s. She looked great in all her clothing. However she didn’t pass along her gift of cleavage. I am short and petite like her.
        When I was a little girl we would drink this nasty powdery concoction called Wate On. Really gross and tasted like liquid chalk! LOL! Very glad for Ensure which taste like a chocolate shake!
        If Aladdins is busy I need to make a phone call to my Fairy Godmother! LOL! SOS for bigger breasts! 😆😉😅😄😃🤣😂😁😀😎🤓

        Liked by 1 person

      3. KML@ SOS Bigger breast! Unfortunately I got everything from my grandmother with the exception of her hight, she was about 5’9. I’m the shortest of my siblings.

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  2. Reblogged this on Tamara Kulish and commented:
    Louise Hay was a big influence for me in helping to love my body and to accept myself!

    I’ve been practicing telling my body it’s beautiful!

    Thanking it for carrying me around all these years and doing a great job of it!

    Feeling grateful that my body has been healthy, which in turn makes me want to take care of it more and more so it will continue to be healthy!

    Practice touching my “trouble spots” and saying you are wonderful!

    For in a world of self loathing, loving ourselves is the biggest act of rebellion… and it feels so good to do it!

    It takes baby steps to learn to love ourselves and our bodies but with practice it’s possible!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Louise Hay was a big influence for me in helping to love my body and to accept myself!

    I’ve been practicing telling my body it’s beautiful!

    Thanking it for carrying me around all these years and doing a great job of it!

    Feeling grateful that my body has been healthy, which in turn makes me want to take care of it more and more so it will continue to be healthy!

    Practice touching my “trouble spots” and saying you are wonderful!

    For in a world of self loathing, loving ourselves is the biggest act of rebellion… and it feels so good to do it!

    It takes baby steps to learn to love ourselves and our bodies but with practice it’s possible!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She was a phenomenal woman and truly an inspiration to The World.
      You said it! Learning to love ourselves is a process and one that takes time and LOTS of willpower.

      Like

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